BIG data

Ethics Of Biomedical Big Data
ethics of biomedical big data
Year 2016
Language: English
Pages: 478
ISBN 10: 3319335251
ISBN 13: 9783319335254
Synopsis
Mining The Social Web
mining the social web
Year 2019
Language: English
Pages: 423
ISBN 10: 1491985046
ISBN 13: 9781491985045
Synopsis
The Information Trade
the information trade
Year 2020
Language: English
Pages: 252
ISBN 10: 0062888986
ISBN 13: 9780062888983
Synopsis
Weapons Of Math Destruction
weapons of math destruction
Year 2016
Language: English
Pages: 209
ISBN 10: 0553418823
ISBN 13: 9780553418828
Synopsis
The NIH's Role In Biomedical Big Data
nih big data

The Ethics Of Biomedical Big Data

This book presents cutting edge research on the new ethical challenges posed by biomedical Big Data technologies and practices. ‘Biomedical Big Data’ refers to the analysis of aggregated, very large datasets to improve medical knowledge and clinical care. The book describes the ethical problems posed by aggregation of biomedical datasets and re-use/re-purposing of data, in areas such as privacy, consent, professionalism, power relationships, and ethical governance of Big Data platforms.

Approaches and methods are discussed that can be used to address these problems to achieve the appropriate balance between the social goods of biomedical Big Data research and the safety and privacy of individuals. Seventeen original contributions analyse the ethical, social and related policy implications of the analysis and curation of biomedical Big Data, written by leading experts in the areas of biomedical research, medical and technology ethics, privacy, governance and data protection. The book advances our understanding of the ethical conundrums posed by biomedical Big Data, and shows how practitioners and policy-makers can address these issues going forward.

Mining the Social Web: Data Mining Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram

Mine the rich data tucked away in popular social websites such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram. With the third edition of this popular guide, data scientists, analysts, and programmers will learn how to glean insights from social media--including who's connecting with whom, what they're talking about, and where they're located - using Python code examples, Jupyter notebooks, or Docker containers. In part one, each standalone chapter focuses on one aspect of the social landscape, including each of the major social sites, as well as web pages, blogs and feeds, mailboxes, GitHub, and a newly added chapter covering Instagram.

Part two provides a cookbook with two dozen bite-size recipes for solving particular issues with Twitter. Get a straightforward synopsis of the social web landscape. Use Docker to easily run each chapter's example code, packaged as a Jupyter notebook Adapt and contribute to the code's open source GitHub repository. Learn how to employ best-in-class Python 3 tools to slice and dice the data you collect. Apply advanced mining techniques such as TFIDF, cosine similarity, collocation analysis, clique detection, and image recognition. Build beautiful data visualizations with Python and JavaScript toolkits.

The Information Trade: How Big Tech Conquers Countries, Challenges Our Rights, and Transforms Our World

In this timely, provocative, and ultimately hopeful book, a widely respected government and tech expert reveals how Facebook, Google, Amazon, Tesla, and other tech giants are disrupting the way the world works, and outlines the growing risk they pose to our future if we do not act to contain them.

Today’s major technology companies — Google, Facebook, Amazon, Tesla, and others — wield more power than national governments. Because of their rising influence, Alexis Wichowski, a former press official for the State Department during the Obama administration, has re-branded these major tech companies “net states.”

In this comprehensive, engaging, and prescriptive book, she considers their growing and unavoidable influence in our lives, showing in eye-opening detail how these net states are conquering countries, disrupting reality, and jeopardizing our future — and what we can do to regulate and reform the industry before it does irreparable harm to the way we think, how we act, and how we’re governed. Combining original reporting and insights drawn from more than 100 interviews with technology and government insiders, including Microsoft president Brad Smith, Google CEO Eric Schmidt, the former Federal Trade Commission chair under President Obama, the co-founder of the Center for Humane Technology , and the managing director of Jigsaw — Google’s Department of Counterterrorism against extremist and cyber-attacks. The Information Trade explores what happens when we cede our power to them, willingly trading our personal freedom and individual autonomy for an easy, plugged-in existence.

Neither an industry apologist or fearmonger, Wichowski reminds us that we are not helpless victims; we still control our relationship with the technologies and the companies behind them. Most important, she shows us how we can curtail and control net states in practical, actionable ways — and makes urgently clear what’s at stake if we don’t.

Weapons of Math Destruction

We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives — where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance — are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: Everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated.

But as Cathy O’Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they’re wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination: If a poor student can’t get a loan because a lending model deems him too risky (by virtue of his zip code), he’s then cut off from the kind of education that could pull him out of poverty, and a vicious spiral ensues. Models are propping up the lucky and punishing the downtrodden, creating a “toxic cocktail for democracy.” Welcome to the dark side of Big Data.

Tracing the arc of a person’s life, O’Neil exposes the black box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society. These “weapons of math destruction” score teachers and students, sort résumés, grant (or deny) loans, evaluate workers, target voters, set parole, and monitor our health.

O’Neil calls on modelers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use. But in the end, it’s up to us to become more savvy about the models that govern our lives. This important book empowers us to ask the tough questions, uncover the truth, and demand change.